Instrumental Drawing

Many areas in visual communication rely on the use of precise drawing instruments. Architects, engineers, product designers and interior designers recognise and use standard instrumental drawing methods to convey complex information about constructed and manufactured objects.

Setting up the page:

When creating an instrumental drawing, you may be asked to set up a drawing area in a formal manner. There is a number of page set-up formats, but it is important to keep in mind that the page is designed to convey as much information as possible about the drawing itself. Any additional information should not detract from the drawing content.

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TASK ONE – ORTHOGRAPHIC DRAWING

  Analyse the ISOMETRIC drawing. Complete a thrid-angle orthographic drawing that adheres to international standards and conventions.

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TASK TWO – ORTHOGRAPHIC DRAWING

 Orthographic Task Analyse the ISOMETRIC drawing. Complete a thrid-angle orthographic drawing that adheres to international standards and conventions.Drawing must be finelined & include dimensions

DIMENSIONING

Dimensioning is the placement of measurements on an orthoganol drawing. Like other aspects of this drawing method, there are strict conventions that need to be followed.

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TASK THREE – ORTHOGRAPHIC DRAWING TEST

  Your on your own! Analyse the ISOMETRIC drawing. Complete a thrid-angle orthographic drawing that adheres to international standards and conventions.

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TASK FOUR – Introduction to ISOMETRIC drawings

  Convert the ‘third-angle orthographic’ drawing to an ISOMETRIC drawing using the grid paper.

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Test Your Knowledge:

The word orthographic and projection are combined from other phrases. Ortho means ‘straight’ or ‘right angles’ and graphic means ‘written or drawn’. Similarly, projection combines two Latin words, pro meaning ‘forward’ and jacere meaning to ‘throw’. What do we get when we put these words together?

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